Gupta Empire - General Knowledge Question and Answer

Gupta Empire - Question and Answer

When Sri Gupta started his kingdom?  


240 A.D
280 A.D
200 A.D
320 A.D

Answer:

Sri Gupta (r.240 -280 CE) was a pre-imperial Gupta king in northern India and the founder of the Gupta dynasty. Northern or central Bengal might have been the home of Guptas at that time, however, little evidence is available.

The Poona copper inscription of Prabhavati Gupta, a daughter of Chandragupta II, describes "Maharaja Sri-Gupta" as the founder of the Gupta dynasty. Sri Gupta is identified with the king Che-li-ki-to mentioned in the writings of the Chinese traveller Yijing, who wrote around 690 CE, and described the king as having ruled 500 years earlier. According to Yijing's account, Sri Gupta ordered the construction of a temple at Mrgasikhavana for the use of Buddhist pilgrims coming from China, endowing it with the revenue from 40 villages.


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Who was the father of Chandragupta I?  


Sri Gupta
Ghatotkacha
Samudragupta
None

Answer:

Chandragupta I was the son of Ghatotkacha and the grandson of Sri Gupta. Unlike his predecessors, who were known as Maharaja (king), he came to be known as Maharajadhiraja (king of kings). He came to power in 320 CE as his father Ghatotkacha died leaving him on the throne. However, it remains unknown how he expanded a "small principality to the status of an important kingdom" by annexing neighbouring kingdoms. He also married a Licchhavi princess, Kumaradevi, indicating that the matrimonial connections between the two led to the "political greatness" of the Gupta dynasty.


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Who is known as the Napoleon of India?  


Chandragupta I
Samudragupta
Chandagupta Maurya
Ashoka

Answer:

Samudragupta was known as Napolean of India.

Samudragupta (r.c.335-c. 380 CE) was the fourth ruler of the Gupta Empire and the son and successor of Chandragupta I. His rule was one of expansion marked first by the conquest of his immediate neighbours and then by campaigns to the east and the south where chiefdoms and kingdoms were subdued and forced to pay tribute to him. Much of the knowledge of Samudragupta's military exploits comes from the Allahabad Pillar of Ashoka which includes a prashasti (a eulogy) extolling the deeds and virtues of the Gupta emperor. Going by the inscription, Samudragupta exerted direct or indirect control over much of the Indian subcontinent stretching from kingdoms in Nepal and the Punjab in the north all the way to the Pallava kingdom at Kanchipuram in the south-east.

Samudragupta was the son of Chandragupta I and the Lichchhavi princess, Kumaradevi. He is believed to have been his father's chosen successor even though he had several elder brothers. Therefore, some believe that after the death of Chandragupta I, there was a struggle for succession in which Samudragupta prevailed. It is said that Samudragupta became the ruler after subduing his rival, Kacha, an obscure prince of the dynasty.


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Who was the first Maharajadhiraja?  


Chandragupta I
Samudragupta
Chandragupta II
Ashoka

Answer:

Chandragupta I was a king of the Gupta Empire around 320 CE. As the ruler of the Gupta Empire, he is known for forging alliances with many powerful families in the Ganges region.

Chandragupta I was the son of Ghatotkacha and the grandson of Sri Gupta. Unlike his predecessors, who were known as Maharaja (king), he came to be known as Maharajadhiraja (king of kings). He came to power in 320 CE as his father Ghatotkacha died leaving him on the throne. However, it remains unknown how he expanded a "small principality to the status of an important kingdom" by annexing neighbouring kingdoms. He also married a Licchhavi princess, Kumaradevi, indicating that the matrimonial connections between the two led to the "political greatness" of the Gupta dynasty.


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Who was the father of Samudragupta?  


Sri Gupta
Chandragupta I
Chandragupta II
Ramagupta

Answer:

Samudragupta was the son of Chandragupta I and the Lichchhavi princess, Kumaradevi. He is believed to have been his father's chosen successor even though he had several elder brothers. Therefore, some believe that after the death of Chandragupta I, there was a struggle for succession in which Samudragupta prevailed. It is said that Samudragupta became the ruler after subduing his rival, Kacha, an obscure prince of the dynasty.


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Harisena was the _________ of Gupta Emperor,Samudragupta.  


Sanskrit poet
Panegyrist
Government minister
All

Answer:

Harisena, also Harishena or Hirisena, was a 4th-century Sanskrit poet, panegyrist, and government minister. He was an important figure in the court of the Gupta emperor, Samudragupta. His most famous poem, written c. 345 CE, describes the bravery of Samudragupta and is inscribed on the Allahabad Pillar. At least one of his known inscriptions was written as a panegyric.

Harisena was an early writer of Kavya poetry; Arthur Berriedale Keith says of it, "Harisena's poem bears expressly the title Kavya, though it consists both of prose and verse. Its structure is similar to the delineation of kings adopted in the prose romances of Subandhu and Bana". Other works attributed to either this author (or others by the same name) include Apabramsa Dharmapariksa, Karpuraprakara (Suktavall), the medical treatise Jagatsundari-Yogamaladhikara, Yasodharacanta, Astahnikakatha and Brhatkathakosa. He was also the chief minister of Samudragupta's empire. Harishena had a great interest in playing the lute with his friend Samudragupta. Harishena had also played an important role in the coronation of Samudragupta with Kumaradevi.


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Who was the wife of Ramagupta?  


Kuberanaga
Kumaradevi
Dhruvswamini
None

Answer:

According to Natya-darpana, Ramgupta was a coward. He married the woman, Dhruvaswamini by force who was engaged with his brother Chandragupta II. He also became the King of the Gupta empire, though his brother was declared as the future King of the Gupta empire after Samudragupta's death. According to traditional accounts, Ramagupta decided to expand his kingdom by attacking the Sakas in Gujarat. The campaign soon took a turn for the worse and the Gupta army was trapped. The Saka king, Rudrasimha III, demanded that Ramagupta hand over his wife Dhruvswamini in exchange for peace. The weak king was inclined to accept these terms, to the outrage of his wife and his brother Chandragupta. Using subterfuge, Chandragupta went to the Saka camp, killed the Saka king and won the victory and also the esteem of the people and the queen. A short while later, Ramagupta was deposed and killed by his brother, who became Chandragupta II. Chandragupta II also married his erstwhile sister-in-law, Dhruvswamini.


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Fa-Hien came to India at the time of  


Chandragupta Maurya
Chandragupta II
Ashoka
Chandragupta I

Answer:

Fa-Hien (c.337-c.422) was the first of the three notable Buddhist pilgrims from China who visited India from the fifth to the seventh centuries CE in search of knowledge, manuscripts, and relics. Fa-Hien arrived during the reign of Chandragupta II. While he did not mention Chandragupta Vikramaditya by name in his travelogue, he provided a general description of North India at that time. Among other things, he reported about the absence of capital punishment, the lack of a poll-tax and land tax. Most citizens did not consume onions, garlic, meat, and wine.

Faxian wrote, "The people were rich and prosperous and seemed to emulate each other in the practice of virtue. Charitable institutions were numerous and rest houses for travelers were provided on the highway. The capital possessed an excellent hospital."


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Kumargupta I was the son of  


Samudragupta
Chandragupta II
Chandragupta I
None

Answer:

Kumaragupta I, also known as Shakraditya and Mahendraditya, was an emperor of the Gupta Empire in 415-455 CE. He was the son of his predecessor, Chandragupta II, and Dhruvadevi (also known as Dhruvasvamini). He was an able ruler and retained, intact, the vast empire, which extended from Bengal to Kathiawar and from the Himalayas to the Narmada. He ruled efficiently for nearly forty years. However, the last days of his reign were not good. The Gupta Empire was threatened by the rebellion of Pushyamitras of central India and invasion of the White Huns (probably the Kidarites). But, Kumaragupta was successful in defeating both threats and performed the Ashvamedha (horse sacrifice) to celebrate his victory. He issued new coins with images of his namesake, Lord Kumara.


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Who builds Nalanda University?  


Samudragupta
Kumaragupta
Chandragupta II
Chandragupta I

Answer:

Nalanda's datable history begins under the Gupta Empire and a seal identifies a monarch named Shakraditya as its founder. Both Xuanzang and a Korean pilgrim named Prajnyavarman attribute the foundation of a sangharama (monastery) at the site to him. Shakraditya is identified with the 5th-century CE Gupta emperor, Kumaragupta I (r.c. 415 - c. 455 CE), whose coin has been discovered at Nalanda. His successors, Buddhagupta, Tathagatagupta, Baladitya, and Vajra, later extended and expanded the institution by building additional monasteries and temples.

The Guptas were traditionally a Brahmanical dynasty. Narasimhagupta (Baladitya) however, was brought up under the influence of the Mahayanist philosopher, Vasubandhu. He built a sangharama at Nalanda and also a 300 ft (91 m) high vihara with a Buddha statue within which, according to Xuanzang, resembled the "great Vihara built under the Bodhi tree". The Chinese monk also noted that Baladitya's son, Vajra, who commissioned a sangharama as well, "possessed a heart firm in faith".


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Who was the last king of Gupta dynasty?  


Vishnugupta
Kumaragupta III
Vainyagupta
None

Answer:

Vishnugupta Candraditya was one of the lesser known kings of the Gupta Dynasty. He is generally considered to be the last recognized king of the Gupta Empire. His reign lasted 10 years, from 540 to 550 CE. From the fragment of his clay sealing discovered at Nalanda during the excavations of 1927-28, it is revealed that he was the son of Kumaragupta III and the grandson of Narasimhagupta.


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